Oct 21, 2020  
2018-2019 General Catalog 
    
2018-2019 General Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG–FOR INFORMATION ONLY]

Course Descriptions


See Course Description Information  for SUU practices on course prefixes and numbering.

 

Psychology

  
  •  

    PSY 4930 - Senior Project: Independent Research I


    3 Credit(s)

    Ideally suited to students wishing to pursue a research-oriented career or a graduate degree in psychology. This course reviews and expands on skills required to conduct and disseminate research using the scientific method. By the end of the semester, students are expected to submit an IRB research proposal and successfully defend their thesis proposal. Students are then encouraged to register for PSY 4940 , giving them the opportunity to carry out their research project. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): PSY 4935  

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1010  and PSY 2010  and PSY 3010  and PSY 3015  and instructor permission - Prerequisite Min. Grade: C-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PSY 4935 - Senior Project: Independent Research I Lab


    1 Credit(s)

    In this lab, students enrolled in PSY 4930  will perform computer-based and supervised activities such as turnitin.com registration and use, electronic literature searches, selection of inferential statistical tests using decision trees, data set analysis and interpretation using SPSS, graphing with Microsoft Excel, IRB submissions, and PowerPoint presentations (their creation and dissemination). (As Needed) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): PSY 4930  

    Prerequisite(s): (PSY 1010  and PSY 2010  and PSY 3010  and [(PSY 3400  and PSY 3405 ) or (PSY 3410  and PSY 3415 ) or (PSY 3430  and PSY 3435 )] - Prerequisite Min. Grade: C-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PSY 4940 - Senior Project: Independent Research II


    3 Credit(s)

    Ideally suited to students wishing to pursue a graduate degree in psychology. This course allows students to conduct research for which they have received IRB approval. Students will complete their research project and submit an APA-style professional paper. Though not required, it is anticipated that many students will submit their research for presentation and/or publication. Course may be repeated for up to 12 credits with a maximum of 3 credits applied toward a psychology degree. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 12

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PSY 4950 - History and Systems


    3 Credit(s)

    This course serves as one option for satisfying the senior requirement of the psychology major. This course is a comparison of different theories and methods of psychology and their historical context. An evaluation of theories and methods from philosophical and scientific standpoints will be carried out. This is a capstone course and should be taken late in the junior or senior year. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1010   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None


Public Administration

  
  •  

    PADM 6000 - Program Overview and Theory of Public Administration


    3 Credit(s)

    This is a foundation course that provides an overview of the MPA program and introduces students to the public administration profession. Students learn about MPA curriculum, areas of emphasis, and the experiential learning requirements. Additionally, students study the theoretical and practical framework for public administration, as well as competencies required for career public servants and nonprofit administrators. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6200 - Public Sector Economics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the theory and practice of public sector economics and decision-making. This course provides an overview of basic economics, political influences, information management and requirements, and fiduciary responsibilities for public funds. Emphasis is given to subnational levels of government and nonprofit organizations. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): MA in Arts Administration or MPA majors only

  
  •  

    PADM 6300 - Administrative Law


    3 Credit(s)

    Analyzes the authority of administrative agencies with an emphasis on the study of the administrative relationship between the legislature, government, executives, and regulatory agencies, as well as the judicial review of administrative agencies. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6440 - Research Methods


    3 Credit(s)

    Students develop critical-thinking skills as they apply quantitative and qualitative research methods to research projects. Public service values serve as a framework for conducting research, evaluating programs, and interpreting analyses. Students leave with the ability to design research projects, conduct surveys, and analyze policies and programs. Students are encouraged to complete nine (9) credits of MPA courses before enrolling in this course. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6500 - Public Human Resources Management


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides MPA students with the knowledge and skills to supervise and manage employees. Topics include how to set performance expectations, motivate and coach for performance improvement, comply with HR rules/regulations, and incorporate staff needs into the budget process. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): MPA majors only

  
  •  

    PADM 6540 - Higher Education Law and Policy


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides the background for understanding the law and policy of higher education in the United States, particularly in Utah. It covers policy topics including the governance of higher education as well as legal issues relating to college employees, faculty, and students. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6550 - Student Affairs in Higher Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the Student Affairs profession. Historical, ethical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations are explored. Core competencies and functional areas within the profession, diversity of institutional type, student populations, characteristics of today’s college students, and contemporary issues are examined. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6560 - American Higher Education Environments


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the types of learning environments and different models of organizational functioning that currently exist in American colleges and universities. Students analyze and examine the influence environments have on individual behavior and how environments can be shaped and created to encourage students learning and engagement. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6570 - Student Development in College, Theory, and Practice


    3 Credit(s)

    Understanding the psychosocial development of college students is necessary for designing student affairs programs and developing a student affairs practice. This course is designed to help graduate students effectively integrate theories of student development with the day to day practice of being a student affairs professional, and learn to become both and administrator and a “helper.” (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6580 - The History of American Higher Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the historical foundations and evolution of higher education to understand the emergence of American higher education and some of the social, cultural, and political events of historical significance. Students will develop context from which to appreciate the ever-changing landscape of higher education as well as the impact societal expectations have on higher education. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6600 - Leadership and Management in the Public Sector


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the differences between leadership and management and how each can apply to the public and nonprofit professional. Students will complete self-assessments and evaluate personal strengths and weaknesses as they learn now ethical guidelines, organization theories, human behaviors, and public sector values impact leaders and managers in the public and nonprofit sectors. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6610 - Public Policy Analysis


    3 Credit(s)

    An examination of the institutions that combine to make, implement, and evaluate American public policy. Various models of public policymaking will be studied and applied. A variety of substantive areas may be the focus of this course. (Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6615 - Comparative Public Policy


    3 Credit(s)

    Students will analyze how historical, economic legal, political, and social considerations affect public policy development in the US and throughout the world. Comparative public policy is mostly concerned with examining how public policies differ when comparing different countries, why public policies differ, and the impact public policies have on societies. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6620 - Critical Thinking and Ethics in the Public Sector


    3 Credit(s)

    An exploration of the role of ethics in public administration with an emphasis on standards of professional conduct, ethics and constitutionalism, and the ethical implications of law, policy, procedure, and practices within public administration. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 6

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6630 - State and Local Government


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the principles and practices of the structure, administration, financing, and politics of state and local government. Special attention focuses on the allocation of authority, roles, responsibilities, and cross-cutting policy issues affecting the operation of states and localities. (Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): MPA majors only

  
  •  

    PADM 6640 - Constitutional Law


    3 Credit(s)

    This course offers a scholarly and professional-based examination of constitutional law. It provides public administrators with the background, awareness, and critical knowledge about constitutional standards, fundamental constitutional foundations, and pitfalls they may encounter as they execute their administrative duties. (Fall) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6650 - Managing America’s Cities


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to give students an overview of city management. It will review the laws that create and enable municipalities and it will explore the effects of different city organizational structures. Additionally, the course will review several case studies that explore the many policy and management changes experienced by city managers. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6670 - Public Sector Contracting


    3 Credit(s)

    This course prepares students to create, manage, and evaluate projects that require contracts between vendors and the government. Students will consider environmental impact, construction standards, and multiple risks associated with contracts. The will collaborate as they develop and report on a multi-faceted project, as well as select vendors and determine projected costs. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6700 - Organization and Administration at the Criminal Justice Agency


    3 Credit(s)

    This course identifies and develops the practices and principles to organize and administer the goals and objectives of middle- and upper-level management and administration officials in the three primary criminal justice agencies: police, courts, and corrections. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6710 - Community Policing Administration


    3 Credit(s)

    This course identifies and develops the practices and principles to implement, organize, administer, and evaluate the “Community Policing” administration concepts in the policing aspect of the criminal justice system. (Fall) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): PADM 6700   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: C-
    Registration Restriction(s): MPA majors only

  
  •  

    PADM 6720 - Criminal Justice Policy


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the impact of crime prevention policies on crime rates while considering the diversity of crime and criminals. Students will analyze the effectiveness of policies designed to prevent retail sector crimes, substance abuse, and street rimes. (Fall) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6750 - Special Topics in Public Administration


    3 Credit(s)

    Topics vary each semester but generally focus on current issues related to administration, policy, and theoretical foundations for contemporary issues in public administration. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 6

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6830 - Readings and Conferences


    1 Credit(s) 3 Maximum Credit(s)

    This course provides graduate students with the opportunity to do extended readings on a specialized public administration topic. Students can also use this to launch or complete the major research project. Full-time graduate faculty in the department can approve enrollment. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission required
    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 6

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6890 - MPA Internship


    1 Credit(s) 6 Maximum Credit(s)

    The MPA Internship is a required elective for all students who have less than one (1) year of professional experience in the public or nonprofit sector. Students must complete 300 internship hours. Students usually enroll for three (3) credit hours and finish in one (1) semester. If not, students must enroll for at least one (1) credit hour each semester until the internship is completed. Students seeking to waive this requirement must explain in writing how s/he developed the competencies normally developed in the internship experience and why the requirement should be waived. (As Needed) [Pass/Fail]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission required
    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 6

    Registration Restriction(s): MPA majors only

  
  •  

    PADM 6900 - MPA Thesis


    1 Credit(s) 6 Maximum Credit(s)

    This is one of two options available to meet the experiential learning requirement. Students develop a proposal, complete the research, and write a traditional thesis. Students must form a thesis committee consisting of a chair and two (2) members. The chair and one (1) member must serve as MPA faculty or adjunct. The third committee member should be drawn from the professional or academic community and have experience or knowledge related to the thesis topic. Students usually enroll for three (3) credit hours when the thesis begins. If not completed in the initial semester, students must enroll for a minimum of one (1) credit hour each subsequent semester until the thesis is completed. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission required
    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 6

    Registration Restriction(s): MPA majors only

  
  •  

    PADM 6950 - Professional Project


    1 Credit(s) 6 Maximum Credit(s)

    The Professional Project is one of two options available to meet the experiential learning requirement. Students write a proposal for a project that benefits a public or nonprofit organization. Students complete the project and submit a final project report. Students are encouraged to orally present the results to the supervising official along with the written report. The project may be completed for the student’s current employer, but cannot be a part of the student’s day-to-day work responsibilities. Students usually enroll for three (3) credit hours and finish in one (1) semester. If not, students must enroll for at least one (1) credit hour each semester until the project is completed. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission required
    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 6

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    PADM 6990 - Capstone in Public Administration


    3 Credit(s)

    Students demonstrate knowledge and competencies acquired in previous MPA coursework by completing a capstone project. Students map a personal career path and create a plan to strengthen and maintain the competencies for lifelong learning. Students integrate public service values and ethics into their projects and future pursuits. Students may complete their Professional Project concurrent with this class. (As Needed) [Thesis/Final Capstone Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): PADM 6440   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: B-
    Registration Restriction(s): MPA majors only

  
  •  

    PADM 6999 - Capstone Continuance


    1 Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Thesis/Final Capstone Pass/Fail]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 12

    Registration Restriction(s): None


Range Management

  
  •  

    RANG 3600 - Range Management


    3 Credit(s)

    Evaluation, improvement, and perpetuation of range lands. Three (3) hours of lecture per week. (Fall) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): RANG 3605 

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 3605 - Range Management Lab


    1 Credit(s)

    Lab to accompany RANG 3600. One (1) three-hour meeting per week. Longer field trips may be scheduled. (Fall) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): RANG 3600 

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 3800 - Wildland Plant Identification


    3 Credit(s)

    Autecology, identification; value; and uses of woody, forb, grass, and grass-like species found in major plant communities of the west and central U.S.. Emphasis will be on native and important introduced. (Spring) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): RANG 3805 

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 3805 - Wildland Plant Identification Lab


    1 Credit(s)

    Plant identification of wildland ecosystems based on sight recognition of morphological characteristics, with limited use of plant keys. Field trips will supplement the lab. (Spring) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): RANG 3800 

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 4000 - Rangeland - Ungulate Animal Relations


    3 Credit(s)

    Characterization of domestic and wild animal use of rangelands as related to environmental factors, foraging behavior, and nutrition needs emphasizing the interaction of rangeland and animal resources to optimize nutrient intake. (Spring) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): RANG 3600   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: C-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 4200 - Wildland Ecology


    3 Credit(s)

    Ecology of western wildlands including major life zones, ecosystems, range plant responses and inventories, monitoring, and grazing systems. Will include current issues in wildland ecology. (Spring) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): RANG 3600  - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 4400 - Wildland Restoration


    3 Credit(s)

    Fundamentals of restoring, reclaiming, and improving disturbed landscapes and ecosystems, including assessment of site conditions, restoration goals and feasibility; hydrologic, biotic, and soil function. (Fall) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): RANG 4405 

    Prerequisite(s): RANG 3800  and RANG 4200  - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 4405 - Wildland Restoration Lab


    1 Credit(s)

    Fundamentals of restoring and improving disturbed landscapes and ecosystems. Topics include assessment of site conditions, goals and feasibility, and using hydrologic, biotic, and soil functions. (Fall) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): RANG 4400 

    Prerequisite(s): RANG 3800  and RANG 4200  - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 4850 - Undergraduate Research


    1 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Original research arranged by contract with an appropriate faculty supervisor. Students are required to present their results to an audience outside of the department. May be repeated for credit, up to a maximum of five (5) credits. (Fall, Spring) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 5

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 4890 - Internship


    1 Credit(s) 4 Maximum Credit(s)

    Designed to provide on-the-job experience in natural resources/range. Requires three (3) hours of work per week per credit hour. The internship site must be pre-approved by an agriculture instructor. May be repeated for credit, up to a maximum of 12 credits. (Fall, Spring) [Pass/Fail]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 12

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    RANG 4920 - Workshop


    1 Credit(s) 3 Maximum Credit(s)

    Designed to give credit for intensive range learning situations outside of the traditional class and lab. Students may receive workshop credit for activities such as seminars, short courses, in-service training, and travel study. Workshop credit must be arranged by a Range Program faculty member and receive approval at the departmental level. May be repeated for credit, up to a maximum of six (6) credits. (Fall, Spring) [Pass/Fail]

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 6

    Registration Restriction(s): None


Science

  
  •  

    SCI 1010 - Medical Terminology


    2 Credit(s)

    Basic course in the technical language of medicine. Using a student-directed approach textbook and audio cassette system, students learn the technical terms and language. Course meets two (2) hours per week. Recommended for anyone interested in health or medicine careers. (Fall, Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): English as a Second Language majors may not enroll

  
  •  

    SCI 1020 - Pharmacology


    1 Credit(s)

    This course is designed for those students who are pursuing Athletic Training as a major or related majors. It provides instruction on the many facets of pharmacology: i.e., how drugs work in the body, indications and adverse effects, abuse of medications, legal aspects of medicines, and where to look for applicable drug information. (Fall - Odd Years) [Pass/Fail]

    Registration Restriction(s): English as a Second Language majors may not enroll

  
  •  

    SCI 2120 - Service Learning


    1 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to take the student volunteer through the process of volunteerism and its application to themselves and their academic training through practical experience and critical reflection. May be taken two (2) times for credit. This is a designated Service Learning course. (Fall, Spring, Summer) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 2

    Registration Restriction(s): English as a Second Language majors may not enroll

  
  •  

    SCI 2300 - Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course


    6 Credit(s)

    This course will prepare the student to become a competent, entry-level EMT, ready to serve in a career or volunteer position within the Emergency Medical System. Coursework includes lecture, practical skills, and ambulance ride-along hours. (As Needed) [Pass/Fail]

    Registration Restriction(s): English as a Second Language majors may not enroll

  
  •  

    SCI 3300 - Advanced Emergency Medical Technician


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will prepare the student to become and entry level Advanced EMT. Coursework includes lecture, practical skills, ambulance ride-along hours, and clinical rotations in the emergency room department. Upon successful completion of the program, students will be eligible to acquire the National Registry Certification to further their employment goals. (As Needed) [Pass/Fail]

    Prerequisite(s): SCI 2300   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None


Secondary Education

  
  •  

    SCED 3400 - Educating Diverse Populations


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines the changing dynamics of school populations that includes demographics, race, ethnicity, culture, economics, at-risk populations, and other current issues. (Fall, Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SCED 3570 - Secondary Classroom Management


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines multiple models and theories of classroom management, discipline, and motivation strategies for use in secondary classrooms. Public school practicum is a key component of this course and includes a week in an urban school setting. (Fall, Spring) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): SCED 3590  

    Prerequisite(s): Departmental permission
    Registration Restriction(s): Admission to Education Department required

  
  •  

    SCED 3590 - Instructional Planning, Delivery, and Assessment


    3 Credit(s)

    This course prepares students for all aspects of secondary curriculum planning, instructional delivery, and assessment strategies. A professional teaching unit and work sample will be completed. (Fall, Spring) [Graded]

    Co-requisite(s): SCED 3570  

    Prerequisite(s): Departmental permission
    Registration Restriction(s): Admission to Education Department required

  
  •  

    SCED 3720 - Content Area Literacy and Common Core


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines processes and strategies to assist pre-service candidates in improving the vocabulary, comprehension, and writing skills of their students. Strategies will be emphasized. Teacher Candidates will construct a unit with content literacy strategies that assists diverse learners. (Fall, Spring, Summer) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): Admission to Education Department required

  
  •  

    SCED 4520 - Practicum/Induction Seminar


    2 Credit(s)

    Students will be provided meaningful practicum opportunities, field experience, and induction seminars in the public schools in preparation for student teaching and for entering the job market. (Fall, Spring) [Pass/Fail]

    Prerequisite(s): SCED 3570  and SCED 3590  and departmental permission - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SCED 4980 - Secondary Student Teaching


    8 Credit(s)

    Students will be placed in a public school classroom, based upon their academic preparation, for a comprehensive induction experience prior to secondary licensure. Advanced application required. (Fall, Spring) [Pass/Fail]

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to student teaching
    Registration Restriction(s): Admission to Education Department required


Social Science

  
  •  

    SOSC 4900 - Teaching Social Science Subjects


    2 Credit(s)

    Problems, concepts, methods, and objectives of teaching social science subjects in the areas of history, political science, sociology, and economics. (Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 4980 - Student Teaching


    2 Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Pass/Fail]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5450 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 5

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5500 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 10

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5505 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5510 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 5

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5515 - Practicum


    3 Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5520 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 5

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5530 - Social Studies: Grade 3 Summer Academy


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5540 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 10

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5550 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 10

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5560 - Practicum


    1 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 5

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5570 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 10

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5580 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 5

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOSC 5590 - Practicum


    0.5 Credit(s) 5 Maximum Credit(s)

    Description unavailable. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Repeatable? Yes - Total Credits: 10

    Registration Restriction(s): None


Sociology

  
  •  

    SOC 1010 - Introduction to Sociology


    3 Credit(s)

    Designed to give students a foundation for all future sociological studies. Develops an understanding of the role of social organization on human interaction. Introduces definitions, terms, and concepts used in sociological literature. (Fall, Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): English as a Second Language majors may not enroll

    General Education Course: Social and Behavioral Sciences Knowledge Area
  
  •  

    SOC 1020 - Modern Social Problems


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines current cultural and social aspects of problems such as poverty, racial and gender inequality, crime, health, and illness. The course examines ties between these social problems and their connection to the broader structural issues of inequality. (Fall, Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): English as a Second Language majors may not enroll

    General Education Course: Social and Behavioral Sciences Knowledge Area
  
  •  

    SOC 3000 - Social Inequality and Justice


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines inequality in contemporary societies and people’s collective responses to inequitable situations. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3010 - Origins of Human Society


    3 Credit(s)

    This course offers a sociological/anthropological introduction to the cultural and social origins of human society. Basic theories and principles of sociology and cultural anthropology will be emphasized along with competing contemporary theories of human origin. (Spring) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3030 - Civic Engagement, Service Learning, and Leadership


    3 Credit(s)

    Exploration of the challenges facing contemporary diverse communities, and how sociological ideas and methods can be used to understand social problems and affect change through an engaged-learning approach that combines academic work with community service. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3110 - Culture and Religion in South Asia


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is a window into south Asian nations from Afghanistan to Pakistan. It explores the geographic, social, economic, and political landscapes of South Asian nations through sociological eyes. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3130 - Gender and Work


    3 Credit(s)

    The course examines the changing nature and patterns of work on a worldwide scale from the perspective of gender. Who does what and why? What are the causes and effects of these shifts? (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3140 - Demography


    3 Credit(s)

    An array of social welfare policies and programs in the United States will be discussed and evaluated. This course will focus on the sociopolitical context in which various social policies are developed. Specifically, this course examines conflicts and controversies in the policy decision-making process and policy implications with an emphasis on policy effects on women, racial minorities, and the poor. A comparative perspective is introduced to effectively understand and evaluate these social policies. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3150 - Sociology of Drugs


    3 Credit(s)

    This introduction to the key terms, concepts, and theoretical perspectives of the sociology of drugs and drug use will broaden students’ understanding of the meaning and impact of drugs on society. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3200 - Global Popular Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    Using general theories of the nature of social and cultural structures, this course provides a sociological analysis of everyday American culture. Examining popular culture such as print, media, television, sport, and other aspects of a consumer-driven culture helps understand prevailing values and anticipate changing norms and behaviors. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3250 - Food and Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    This course addresses the relationship between food and culture. It examines food taboos and rituals, food and identity, alcohol and drug use, feasting and fasting, hunger and obesity, and the global politics of food production and consumption. (Annually) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3270 - Sociology of Sports


    3 Credit(s)

    An introduction to the key terms, concepts, and theoretical perspectives of the sociology of sports will broaden students’ understanding of the meaning and impact of sports on culture and society. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3300 - Sociology of Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course analyzes the school as a social organization. Among topics considered are power and control in the school classroom, organization and procedures and their relation to learning, roles of educators, and relations between school and community. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3350 - Social Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides students with a systematic introduction to sociological social psychology. Both sociological and psychological approaches are considered, before specifically addressing the theoretical and empirical studies of symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, and postmodern social psychology. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3370 - Gender and Society in Global Perspectives


    3 Credit(s)

    An introduction to the field of gender studies with a focus on sex-role behavior from several theoretical perspectives. Emphasis is on recent sociological research as well as cross-cultural and historical analysis of women and men in society. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3410 - Environmental Sociology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an exploration of the interconnectedness between the social world of humans and the biophysical world in which they exist. Topics include population growth, land and resourced development, identity attachments to the land, the impact of environmentalism, and environmental justice issues today. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3450 - Applied Research Methods


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides students with a firm grasp of the quantitative and qualitative research methods commonly used in the social sciences, enables students to execute their own worthwhile research projects, and helps students be informed consumers of research. (Fall) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3500 - Deviance


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an exploration of social deviance as evidenced in subcultures in American society. It is designed to apply major criminological and deviance theories to modern-day deviant groups, while contextually examining the construction of deviant identities in relation to mainstream values. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3560 - Sociology of Leisure and Tourism


    3 Credit(s)

    An in-depth course, students will learn about the historical, geographical, cultural, and sociological variability of leisure and tourism, both in America and around the world. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3610 - Juvenile Delinquency


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an exploration of past and current delinquency theories, trends, and issues. Topics included in this course are an extensive review of theory; female delinquency; gangs; the juvenile justice system; police and juveniles; the role of family, peers, schools, and drugs on delinquency; and juvenile corrections today. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3630 - Race and Ethnic Relations


    3 Credit(s)

    A study of the ethnic patterns in contemporary American society. Emphasis is placed on contemporary theories of race and ethnic relations, the problems of prejudice and discrimination, and myths concerning group differences, and contemporary issues and dilemmas of inter-group relations. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3700 - Crime and Society


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is a survey and exploration of crime including a review of classic and contemporary criminological theories, trends in crime, and a brief historical overview. Specific topics will include property crimes, violent crimes and hate crimes, white-collar crimes, organized crime, and police discretion. The criminal justice system will be explored as a process, focusing on the U.S. correctional system today, the prison system, and alternatives to prison. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3750 - Marriage and Family


    3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on the family as a key societal institution and explores the changes taking place in contemporary marriage patterns. We will examine the various components of the family, the variations of contemporary families, and experiences of families of different social classes and ethnicities. We will also explore the realities of marital power, domestic work, child-rearing, family violence, and overall family changes. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): English as a Second Language majors may not enroll

  
  •  

    SOC 3780 - Social Theory


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides an introduction to the major strands of social theory of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Emphasizes the contributions of individual thinkers from each of the key traditions–conflict, functionalist, interactionist, structuralist, feminist, and post-modernist/post-structuralist. (Spring) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3800 - Urban Sociology


    3 Credit(s)

    History of the rise of urban/industrial societies. Examination of the social and economic structures and organization of modern cities. Emphasis on urban social ecology and modern urban social conditions. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3850 - Anthropology and Sociology of Religion


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines religion as a key societal institution and cultural practice. Ethnographic studies illustrate classical and contemporary theories on the meaning, function, and interpretation of religious experience. The intersection of religion with ethnicity, class, gender, and politics is explored. (Annually) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 3900 - Social Movements


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an examination of how social movements arise and are maintained, of why certain kinds of movements emerge, and of what impact they have upon society, both globally and locally. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 4000 - Political Sociology


    3 Credit(s)

    The course is a survey of sociological approaches to power, government, and politics. It will identify key concepts and theories, analyze substantive issues, and consider current research. Contemporary issues and problems will be examined as well. The course will focus on in-class discussion and a student term paper. Can also be counted as a Political Science credit. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 4100 - Sociology of Health and Medicine


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the social construction of health, illness, and healing. Current issues surrounding alternative health care, nutrition, mind/body relationships, and societal change will also be examined. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): Junior or Senior standing required

  
  •  

    SOC 4187 - Humanitarian Aid and Development


    3 Credit(s)

    This course looks at human society as related to so-called “development” and humanitarian aid in the broader context of globalization. Social scientists focus on the local-level processes and experiences, and work to situate those in the larger, macro-level settings. This class will address important themes: 1) cross-cultural and historical perspectives on global relationships; 2) humanitarian aid through political and economic lenses; and 3) community-based approaches to development. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1010  or SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

  
  •  

    SOC 4301 - Social Welfare Policy and Services


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines political and legislative processes that influence the development of social policy and services. Emphasis is on policy-analysis skills at the agency and societal level and teaches both conceptual and analytical skills needed to examine social policies and programs. The course will also draw upon liberal arts background in referring to those economic and political factors that influence the development of social policy. (As Needed) [Graded]

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1010  or SOC 1010  or SOC 1020   - Prerequisite Min. Grade: D-
    Registration Restriction(s): None

 

Page: 1 <- Back 1012 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22